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Martin Kilkie

Martin Kilkie

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Babbage

Babbage is our entry level CPU simulator. It allows teachers and learners to look at how a CPU works but crucially it omits some of the complexity required for higher grades/levels and all of the arithmetic is done in decimal and not binary/hex.

Turing Overview

Turing is a model computer. It contains all the parts that of a real computer but simplified a bit so that you can understand what the parts do when it is working. 

The current release is version 2.0 which contains significant improvements and new features.

There may be some debate about whether Turing is a computer or a CPU – we leave this decision to you, but it contains all CPU components plus a virtualised memory and I/O unit. This is MUCH simpler than even the simplest real CPU/computer but it contains all the parts that are needed.  It also has some parts that are not in a real computer and we will explain these later in this section.

You can see from the diagram above that there are 4 main parts (called units) and a route that connects the units together (this is called a bus). The 4 units are: Control Unit, Arithmetic Unit (inside the Central Processing Unit), Memory Unit and the Input and Output Unit (and the buses connecting them).

Some Key points about Turing:

  1. All registers and locations are 8 bit and are shown in hexadecimal (H) or binary (B), decimal (D) or Octal (O)
  2. Turing contains an accumulator and two other general purpose registers (B and C).
  3. Only the accumulator can carry out arithmetic.
  4. Turing shows flags depending on the result of an operation in the flag register
  5. There are 255 memory locations, each of which hold a 8 bit value.
  6. The memory address register shows which location in the memory block can be accessed
  7. The program counter contains the address in memory where the next program instruction will be taken from
  8. Turing has a simulated I/O unit to allow users to write programs which affect the "outside" of the CPU. 
  9. Turing has a traditional stack and opcodes which manipulate this.
  10. Turing Clock records the time taken for any operation and can be reset manually.

 

 

Where to get our Apps

Our aim is to get our products into the hands of educators and learners as cheaply and easily as possible.

What's new

Kilkiesoft is the brand name for our educational apps.

How we develop Apps

We have been developing educational software since the 1980s.

Turing

Turing is our flagship product, aimed at High level KS4, A level and entry University students who want (or need) to understand the way a CPU inside a computer works.  

Babbage

Babbage is our entry level CPU simulator. It allows teachers and learners to look at how a CPU works but crucially it omits some of the complexity required for higher grades/levels and all of the arithmetic is done in decimal and not binary/hex.

Gates

Gates is our electronic logic gate simulator, designed for KS4 Physics and Computing teachers and learners.

Fetch

The "core" of a computer is the CPU and in general this is just a programmable calculator that begins to operate as soon as it is turned on and continues until it is turned off.

Simplistically, a CPU's job can be summarised as three repeated steps: Fetch the next instruction from memory, Decode what this instruction asks you to do, Carry out this instruction. The FETCH program concentrates on letting students (and teachers) explore this cycle in detail. The screen is a "standard" Babbage screen but the app only lets you step through the operation with single instructions, not run whole programs.

At a Glance

3Overall5Simplicity2Features2Power4Ease of use1Price

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